7 Movies that are better than the book

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Book movies are more of a casual debating topic. And until now, you must have at least witnessed one such warm session between a book lover and a movie freak.

Irrespective of how good book movies turn out to be on the screen, book lovers will never agree with it.

While the opposite case (few) brings a reasonable cause for disagreeing, i.e., movies appear crap when tried to be visualized on screen. Such are always meant to be read and visualized in the head.

Also, no matter how hard a producer tries to create book movies identical with twists and crisp synonymous with the novel, something will be faulty. Considering the complex portions for the movie, paying heavy importance to emotions and slight details gets skipped.

If you are a movie lover, watch the below-listed book movies. And if you aren’t one, still watch them since you are already here.

  • Psycho

Robert Bloch’s 1959 novel, Psycho, is a horror narrative that focuses on Norman Bates and his story. Bates is a keeper of a scary and abandoned hotel.

While the novel was a successful version itself, the movie took it even ahead.

The conversion from book to movie needed a year, with the proceedings withheld by Alfred Hitchcock. A more intense conspiracy was added, which you will find in the 2013 television show- Bates Motel.

The abiding novel is one of the best works given by Robert Blonch that is often tagged as the best horror novel from Blonch. This novel had also gained a stiff mainstream position for decades after its publication.

About the movie: Marian Crane, played by Janet Leigh, lived her latest life in her hotel room, showering and pleasing in the warm water just when she was murdered. Though the novel version missed it, this particular scene was super thrilling, leaving viewers to be fans of book movies.

  • Forrest Gump

The Paramore Pictures’ adaptation as a full-length feature movie was considered in 1994 only, before which the novel had a massive sale of over 30k editions.

The basics of the book and movie are two non-identical pieces. In the novel, you’ll read of Forrest, who ended up being an Astronaut. He meets with Sue, a monkey breed, on one of his missions in space.

On the conversion of the book to the movie, Tom Hank carries the role of Forrest Gump. Hanks’ reel character is said to be an Alamana native who would soon face improved inclinations in US politics. Hank also encompasses the inclination without actually having intentions.

The director of Forrest Gump movie is Robert Zemeckis, while the hands of Winston Groom gave the novel.

  • Blade Runner

One of the best movies based on books by Philip K. Dick is Blade Runner. The 1968 novel is entitled, ‘Do androids dream of electric sheep,’ and is science fiction, how the name suggests.

The storyline is of San Francisco, who just passed the war Apocalypse. The nuclear war is proven as a very destructive protocol resulting in little diversity of wildlife left. Most of what was initially present are swept away, eroding the biodiversity in the process as well.

Very interesting, and just when one could never imagine a better version to it, the 1982 film had surfaced. Both the versions are super good, though the movie is a Lil better, giving fans unnegotiable books vs. movies topic.

It has two main twists with a hunter who has potentially harmed six Nexus-6 model androids and now fled, firstly. The second one is cornering the man who is said to have a poorer IQ level but safeguarding the fleed androids.

  • Fight Club

The fight club is one of those book movies that turned out as every viewer’s favorite at a point. Quite reasonable with the film being better than the novel, given by a talented director- David Fincher. Even the novel’s writer, Chuck Palahniuk, pointed out beforehand that the film will surely have creative add-ons from David that Chuck himself couldn’t see.

‘Fight Club,’ indeed, is one of the best movies based on books that surpass the original narrative version.

In the novel, the young man’s character, living a worldly standard of living, probably has no name. His careers are not going smooth, either.

Readers also came across his suffering from unable to sleep and willingness to die.

  • Jaws

Yes, the Jaws movie is the successor of the Jaws book, written by Peter Benchley. The novel is intensified with a magnificent shark that is pretty much having an eye at the nearby beach town. A small group of only three people takes their chance to kill the shark.

The interesting book laying on the average side was moved forward with Spielberg’s creativity, making it more intensifying and breathtaking.

After about a year of jaws book publication, the movie was out with Director Steven Spielberg. However, the film’s planning was in the onset, days before the novel had been published. Richard D. Zanuck and David Brown, the movie producers, had brought the novel’s movie rights firsthand.

  • The Princess Bride

‘The Princess Bride’ is one of those book movies that are best understood on-screen. The story is mixed with suspense, humor, fantasies, romance, and some fairy ‘things.’

Attained a New York Times bestseller position, the 1973 novel was written and published by William Goldman in 1973.

  • Who Framed Roger Rabbit?

‘Who Framed Roger Rabbit’ got its derivation from the 1981 book movies work of Gary Wolf, ‘Who Censored Roger Rabbit?’.

There is an unlikely universe you’ll be captivated by, where humans and cartoon identities are heard of communicating.

Since the cartoon type of novel is bound not to surpass the perks of visual films, Robert Zemeckis soon had taken the advantage to direct the 1998 movie version.

Viewers and readers watch it with joy even today, often talking about its books vs. movies facts on the way.

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  2. How to download movies on Ipad?

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